On 3 April 2020, the Government announced that it would be making changes to the Companies Act 1993 to provide insolvency relief for businesses affected by COVID-19.

Yesterday, 5 May 2020, the first reading of the COVID-19 Response (Further Management Measures) Legislation Bill) took place. That bill introduces, amongst other measures:

  • Reducing the voidable transaction and voidable charge period for non-related parties to six months (Schedule 2)
  • The safe harbour provisions for directors (Schedule 3)
  • The COVID-19 business debt hibernation (Schedule 4)
  • Extensions to the periods mortgages and rent can be in arrears before default notices can be issued and enforcement action can be taken under the Property Law Act 2007 (Schedule 14)

Both the Safe Harbour provisions and the Business Debt Hibernation scheme are intended to be used by companies who, but for COVID-19 would not be facing cash flow issues.

Safe Harbour Provisions

The safe harbour provisions allow directors to trade during the safe harbour period (initially 3 April 2020 to 30 September 2020) without breaching section 135 (reckless trading) and/or section 136 of the Companies Act 1993 if:

  • The company “was able to pay its debts as they became due in the normal course of business” as at 31 December 2019 (Pre-COVID-19 Solvent); and
  • In good faith, the directors are of the opinion that the company:
    • has or will have short term, COVID-19 related liquidity problems over the next six months; and
    • will (more likely than not) be able to pay its due debts on and after 30 September 2021.

                (Post-COVID-19 Solvency Opinion)

The bill puts the onus on the directors to show that they are entitled to the protection afforded safe harbour provisions. The bill also contemplates that the safe harbour period could be extended beyond 30 September 2020.

Business Debt Hibernation

The Business Debt Hibernation(BDH)  scheme will allow entities (including companies, partnerships, body corporates, and unincorporated bodies) to delay payment of their debts, whether in full or in part, for a period of up to seven months.

Entities will be able to enter into BDH if:

  • The entity was Pre-COVID-19 Solvent;
  • At least 80% of the entity’s directors vote in favour of a resolution to enter into BDH; and
  • Each director who votes in favour of the BDH:
    • Makes a statutory declaration that:
      • The entity was Pre-COVID-19 Solvent
      • The director holds a Post-COVID-19 Solvency Opinion
      • Sets out the grounds for his or her Post-COVID-19 Solvency Opinion

                     (Post-COVID-19 Solvency Declaration)

    • Is acting in good faith

The entity will enter into the BDH when it delivers notice of the BDH to the Registrar (as drafted, all entities will deliver the BDH notice to the Registrar of Companies, not just companies registered on the Companies Register). Entities entering into BDH will have an initial one-month protection period during which creditors will be prevented from starting or continuing enforcement action against the entity and its assets while the entity puts forward its proposed arrangement with its creditors. If the proposed arrangement is supported by 50% of the entity’s creditors (in number and value) who vote on the proposed arrangement, the protection period will be extended for a further six months and all creditors who were sent notice of the proposed arrangement will be bound by the proposed arrangement.

During the protection period (including the extended protection period), unless the approved arrangement provides otherwise or only with the court’s permission:

  • Creditors will not be able to enforce their charges over the entity’s property;
  • Lessors will not be entitled to take possession of the property used or occupied by the entity;
  • Creditors will not be able to begin or continue proceedings for a debt or the recovery of property from the entity;
  • Creditors cannot start or continue enforcement action against the entity;
  • Creditors cannot call on guarantors of BDH debts, if the guarantor is related party of the entity.

The extended protection period will come to an end if at least 80% of the entity’s directors are not prepared to make new Post-COVID-19 Solvency Declarations, if requested to do so by a creditor. Once given, each Solvency Declaration can be supplied to creditors requesting a new Solvency Declaration for a period of up to two months from the date it is given.

The following debts are excluded from BDHs:

  • Employees’ remuneration (including PAYE and other deductions)
  • Amounts owed to secured creditors with security over all or substantially all of the entity’s assets (after the initial one-month protection period)
  • Debts incurred after the company enters BDH
  • Excluded debts (the term “excluded debts” is not defined in the bill)

A BDH does not compromise any of the entity’s debts but an entity in BDH can advance a creditor compromise or be placed into voluntary administration during the protection period.

Progressing the Bill

The bill has been referred to the Epidemic Response Committee, who are due to report back to the house on 12 May 2020.

A date for the second reading of the bill has not yet been announced.

You can find a copy of the bill here

How We Can Help

Directors wanting to take advantage of the Safe Harbour provisions or entities considering the BDH will need to satisfy themselves that the entity was Pre-COVID-19 Solvent and that they have a good faith basis for their Post-COVID-19 Solvency Opinion. Because of these requirements, if you have any hesitation about your entity’s financial position, we strongly recommend that you take advice.

For entities that cannot meet the solvency requirements of the Safe Harbour provisions or the BDH scheme, there are a number of business restructuring options available that could help directors and shareholders navigate their way through the financial challenges brought about by COVID-19.

If you want to discuss the issues your business is facing, email us on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to request a phone call from or Zoom meeting with one of our insolvency practitioners.

 

The Government is introducing legislation to change the Companies Act to help businesses facing insolvency due to COVID-19 to remain viable, with the aim of keeping New Zealanders in jobs.

The temporary changes are outlined here

A safe harbour is granted to directors of solvent companies, who in good faith consider they will more than likely be able to pay its debts that fall due within 18 months. This would rely on trading conditions improving and/or an agreed compromise with creditors. It essentially provides certainty to third parties of an exemption from the Insolvent transaction regime.

The changes allow directors to retain control and encourage directors to talk to their creditors and will if needed enable businesses which satisfy some minimum criteria to enter into a debt hibernation scheme with the consent of creditors.

The following article on the Company Law changes released by Martelli McKegg provides more detail read here 

In summary:

  • Debt hibernation is binding on all creditors (we are uncertain about whether related party creditors can vote, or whether their votes are challengeable) providing that a vote of 50% by number and value is obtained
  • Creditors will have 1 month from the date of proposal to vote during which time there is a moratorium on the enforcement of debts
  • If passed, a further 6 months moratorium will be available
  • To access debt hibernation a threshold will need to be met 
  • It will not apply to Sole Traders

 

Warning for insolvent companies and directors

Directors considering trading on their company need to be careful and cautious and should have their decisions supported by accounts as at 31 December 2019 (as a minimum), and reliable cashflow projections. Companies that cannot satisfy the solvency test at 31 December 2019 or pre Covid-19 impacts should not be advancing a debt hibernation scheme and directors of those companies will not have protection from S135 and S136 claims.

Insolvent companies that are now facing further financial harm as a result of the lockdown should be seriously considering ceasing to trade and entering into either a formal company compromise under Part XIV of the Companies Act 1993, liquidation, or in some cases voluntary administration. The options depend on the viability of the business.

We consider directors of companies on the brink of insolvency should seek independent advice on whether the company meets the debt hibernation criteria and as a minimum we would recommend that financial accounts are being prepared now to 31 December 2019 along with forward looking cashflow projections to support the decision to trade. We expect creditors being asked to vote will require that sort of information to be available. We urge directors to get their Chartered Accountants involved.

Directors need to be aware that the safe harbour provisions may not protect you. For example, if your company has not been able to meet a statutory demand immediately pre-covid, then your company may be deemed insolvent.


McDonald Vague Consulting Support Services

The McDonald Vague team offer the following services as a cost-effective and efficient form of employer assistance in these challenging times.

  • Independent Assessment of solvency to satisfy the Debt Hibernation scheme (requires financials to 31 December 2019)
  • Assistance with Debt Hibernation arrangements, offers and documentation.
  • Company Compromise (for insolvent companies) 
  • Liquidation 
  • Voluntary Administration (recommended for larger companies seeking to compromise with creditors).

 

CONTACT OUR TEAM 

Sunday, 16 October 2011 13:00

Solvent Liquidations

McDonald Vague provides a specialist service conducting solvent liquidations. Companies are often put into liquidation this way when a business has been either sold, closed down or reorganised for tax and/or management purposes.

 

Capital gains on company sales

Under current New Zealand law, companies that have sold their business at a capital profit can then, on liquidation, distribute that profit to their shareholders tax free (arm's length transactions only) under Section CD26 of the Income Tax Act 2007.

There is often debate as to whether a formal liquidation process is necessary to distribute tax free capital profits, or whether it is sufficient to simply have the company struck off the Companies Register. When large sums of money are involved, we believe it is prudent to carry out a formal liquidation that cannot subsequently be challenged by potential creditors. Even though the company may have been removed from the register in a strike off, this will not prevent acrimonious third parties from having the company reinstated at a later date. A formal liquidation ensures peace of mind.

 

Reorganisation of company affairs

McDonald Vague is particularly experienced in reorganisation of companies, especially those with a foreign parent. Amalgamations are commonplace and old entities no longer required are absorbed.

 

Company "deaths"

For a variety of reasons, a company will often reach the end of its useful life. Whilst shareholders may do nothing (annual returns not filed) and wait for the Registrar of Companies to remove the company from the register, shareholders in some circumstances will want some finality to the process. Although the company may have paid all known debts, the shareholders can rest assured that once the formal liquidation process has been completed they are highly unlikely to be called upon for anything that may arise in the future.

 

Processes involved

The directors of a company must first make and file resolutions as to solvency before the liquidation can commence. The shareholders then pass a resolution to appoint a liquidator. The liquidator deals with any liabilities of the company and distributes surplus assets to the shareholders in accordance with their rights.

With an insolvent company the liquidator realises the assets and distributes the cash in accordance with the various priorities. With a solvent company it is possible to make an "in specie" distribution. That is, the assets themselves can be distributed to the shareholders in proportion to their shareholding.

 

Solvent liquidations we have undertaken

McDonald Vague has performed numerous solvent liquidations. Some of the many assignments we have undertaken have included:-

 

  • a group of property management companies (no longer trading) with a parent company domiciled in Hong Kong
  • a pharmaceutical supplies company where the business was sold for capital profit
  • the reorganisation of a group of insurance and financial asset management companies
  • a forestry development winding up
  • a New Zealand advertising agency sold to a major international group but requiring a lengthy liquidation to allow for transfer of intellectual property
  • an investment company (no longer trading) with a US parent company
  • an in-store promotions company where the business was sold for capital gain
  • a Canadian owned manufacturer and distributor of beverages
  • a technology investment company
  • a retailer and distributor of industrial and other chemicals
  • a company specialising in the development of a prominent software package for accountants where the intellectual property was sold for capital gain

 

Please contact Peri Finnigan on 09 303 9519 for confidential, no obligation advice on this area.

DISCLAIMER


This article is intended to provide general information and should not be construed as advice of any kind. Parties who require clarification on issues raised in this article should take their own advice.