Articles

On 15 September 2014, insolvency and business recovery specialists McDonald Vague advised 288 former employees and unsecured creditors totalling $13.112 million that a total dividend pay-out of 100 cents in the dollar had been made to most of them. Given that this was a large corporate failure with initial unsecured claims in excess of $25 million this is a significant pay-out. Early on in the liquidation it looked like creditors would face a nil dividend.  The steps taken to achieve this result include: Engaging in, and winning, a significant arbitration award relating to DML's mining operations at Waihi. Establishing the unsecured creditors' position by disputing and settling several significant unsecured claims for amounts primarily owed by other companies related to…
There are approximately 500,000 small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in New Zealand, most operating without a formal board.  Often there is no separation between family, management and governance. An increasing amount of our work at McDonald Vague is involved in providing independent reviews focusing on restructuring and governance with the aim of helping companies lay the foundations to grow in to larger, more profitable businesses and avoid the mistakes we see time and time again.  Why an independent review? Typically, the need for an independent review is initiated when a particular issue or concern is identified.  This can provide an opportunity to introduce a sound corporate governance process that can not only solve the issue or concern itself, but set…
Did you know that not using the Personal Property Securities Register (PPSR) could expose your business to unnecessary risk?  Despite the fact that the online register celebrated its 10th anniversary in May this year, a surprising number of small business owners are not aware of the reduced financial risk that comes with registering security interests on the PPSR.  Registering your security interest on the PPSR may give you a better chance of recovering a debt if your debtor defaults. (Note:  Suppliers of stock need to register before delivery and suppliers of equipment need to register within 10 working days of delivery).  What a lot of people don't realise is registering on the PPSR is a valid defence against Insolvent Transaction…
Statutory demands - minimising bad debts is critical for any business  Debt collection is difficult for business owners.  Pursuing bad debts early on improves any chance of receiving payment.  A creditor that puts the most pressure on a debtor will most likely receive their money before others; however, they need to be conscious of the voidable transaction regime when they are dealing with an insolvent company.  If you are owed a debt and that debt is not in dispute and you suspect the company you have been trading with may be insolvent, you can issue a statutory demand against the company.  Depending on your terms of trade, a statutory demand will require the debtor to pay you the outstanding debt,…
It is an unfortunate fact that many companies experience financial difficulties at times.  Often the directors/shareholders do not realise that there are a number of options available to them.  This article provides an overview of the various options for distressed companies.   Creditors compromise  A compromise is an agreement between a company and its creditors.  The purpose is to enable a company to trade out of its financial difficulties and thus avoid administration, receivership or liquidation.  In this way the company can survive into the future and provide continuing business to creditors.   There are two basic features of most compromises:   Creditors will be repaid in full or in part over a period.  If creditors are paid in part they write off…
SMEs make up a large part of the insolvency work that we at McDonald Vague handle and the reasons for those insolvencies range from events beyond the control of the company directors to a complete lack of knowledge and understanding as to what is required of them.   In this article we will look at some of the causes, symptoms and actions that can be taken to recover companies facing financial difficulties.   Causes of company failure The causes of company failures, as reported to us by directors, are many and varied and the real reason is not always identified correctly by the directors. There are, however, common themes that come through which include:   1. Having all their eggs…
The Insolvency Act 2006 was implemented on 3 September 2006, and created a new alternative to bankruptcy called the No Asset Procedure ("NAP").  This involves a one year term, rather than the usual three year term in bankruptcy.   The NAP is simply a once-off reprieve for the consumer type small-time debtor who has got out of their financial depth.  To qualify, the debtor must have no assets (except excluded assets - see below), total debts between $1,000 and $40,000, no means to repay any amount, and a clean financial record (not previously bankrupt and not previously admitted to the NAP).   Once admitted to the NAP, the debtor enjoys a moratorium on their debts; with some exceptions these cannot…
Background McDonald Vague partners have been appointed receivers on a number of major appointments, including the recent receivership of Tawera Land Company Limited "TLC". This is an entity owning millions of dollars of farmland associated with bankrupt businessman Ken Thurston. Mr Thurston (formerly a director of 14 other companies) had a rocky financial period which reached its climax in October 2010 when he was adjudicated bankrupt. Since then a number of his companies have failed. TLC owned and operated significant land holdings in the Manawatu and Taumarunui regions comprising 15,000 acres. Over the past six months, our Agri-Business team has managed the farming operations which include a dairy farm as well as sheep and beef farms. One significant event was…
Rule number one in insolvency is to "secure the asset".The recent catastrophes around the world have had a dramatic effect on the New Zealand insurance industry and the ability to obtain insurance.  In particular the Christchurch earthquakes have made it more difficult and costly to obtain insurance cover for some of the properties and goods we need to secure.  We asked Geoff Blampied, CEO, Aon New Zealand to provide some comments and advice on the subject. Geoff writes: Global Perspectives Firstly, we need to look at the Christchurch earthquake losses from a global perspective in order to understand the issues.  Christchurch has now suffered three major quake losses and numerous aftershocks with total estimated insured claims of $26 billion.  These…
Question: Liquidators have different views regarding proxies and representatives of company creditors at creditors meetings. What is the correct procedure? Legislation: The legislation which applies is: The Companies Act 1993, Section 314 The Fifth Schedule to the Companies Act 1993, Clause 6 and Clause 9 The Companies Act 1993 Liquidation Regulations 1994, Regulations 23 and 27. Answer: An examination of the legislation shows that a company may be represented at a meeting of creditors in two separate ways (refer the legislation for full details): - Formally by proxy (in writing): The company may appoint a proxy. The proxy may be any person including the liquidator or if there is no liquidator, the chairperson of a meeting. Where the person appointed…
Question: How can a liquidator be removed from office? Legislation: The legislation which applies is the Companies Act 1993. Introduction Apart from the normal procedures, the office of liquidator also becomes vacant if the person holding office dies or becomes disqualified under Section 280 of the Companies Act 1993. This is the section which deals with qualifications of liquidators. For example, the office would become vacant if the liquidator were to be made bankrupt or were to become subject to a compulsory treatment order under the Mental Health Act. In normal circumstances however, a liquidator is removed from office in one of the four ways: - 1.Removed by Resignation A person may resign from the office of liquidator by appointing…
McDonald Vague provides a specialist service conducting solvent liquidations. Companies are often put into liquidation this way when a business has been either sold, closed down or reorganised for tax and/or management purposes.   Capital gains on company sales Under current New Zealand law, companies that have sold their business at a capital profit can then, on liquidation, distribute that profit to their shareholders tax free (arm's length transactions only) under Section CD26 of the Income Tax Act 2007. There is often debate as to whether a formal liquidation process is necessary to distribute tax free capital profits, or whether it is sufficient to simply have the company struck off the Companies Register. When large sums of money are involved,…
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Page 5 of 9