Business recovery

Even in New Zealand’s currently comparatively benign economic conditions, some businesses inevitably find themselves struggling to survive. If you want your business to survive and then flourish, you need to put a business recovery plan in place. Managing a struggling business is stressful and demanding on directors, management and staff alike. The thought of impending failure is emotionally taxing on all stakeholders. Gambling on the business’ success with money from your family or friends, or extending credit with suppliers just to get by is often a poor strategy. Hope is never a reliable method.Moreover, the ethical challenges involved in risking other peoples’ money is a major stressor for most people.   Why Businesses Find Themselves Struggling Businesses can often struggle…
As it is in all areas of business, when you are seeking advice or input on insolvency matters it is important to go to the right source. There are lawyers and accountants that specialise in insolvency but, depending of the circumstances, and what you are looking to achieve, who you choose is important. Under the current legislation, the Companies Act 1993, anyone, without conflict of interest, and with a few other exceptions, can take an appointment as an Insolvency Practitioner and be appointed as liquidator or receiver of a company. They do not have to have any formal qualification and do not have to be registered or subject to any particular code of conduct. This situation is likely to change…
How is a Receiver Appointed A Receiver is appointed under a general security agreement (GSA) or a deed, or by the High Court. A Court appointed Receivership is less common. Receivers are most commonly appointed over all present and after acquired personal property and undertakings of the company but can also (subject to the security agreement) be appointed over specific assets. A Receiver is most often appointed for financial reasons however Receivers can also be appointed as a result of shareholder dysfunction risking the welfare of the business or perhaps for the reason of fraud. A Receivership is a mechanism for secured creditors to recover moneys due to them when the debtor fails to pay. There must be a default…
Businesses get into difficulty for a range of reasons.  When directors have acted in good faith and react to the situation early enough, and where there is a good prospect of recovery, a compromise may be acceptable to the company’s creditors.  The purpose of a compromise proposal is to increase the likelihood of some classes of creditors receiving more than they would if the company were put into liquidation. Often, voting outcomes rely on the creditors’ opinion of the director(s) but issues can arise when related parties, who may be seen as voting to protect their own interests, are involved. Statutory Requirements The statutory requirements of a compromise are set out under Part 14 of the Companies Act 1993 (“the…
SMEs make up a large part of the insolvency work that we at McDonald Vague handle and the reasons for those insolvencies range from events beyond the control of the company directors to a complete lack of knowledge and understanding as to what is required of them.   In this article we will look at some of the causes, symptoms and actions that can be taken to recover companies facing financial difficulties.   Causes of company failure The causes of company failures, as reported to us by directors, are many and varied and the real reason is not always identified correctly by the directors. There are, however, common themes that come through which include:   1. Having all their eggs…
There have been a number of articles in the media lately that have called into question the integrity and honesty of some insolvency practitioners ("IPs"). In one widely reported example, an IP took $80,900 belonging to a liquidated company and deposited it into his own bank account, which he subsequently used for personal and business expenses. Then there are those IPs who have prior convictions for serious fraud or have been disqualified from professional bodies such as the NZ Institute of Chartered Accountants ("NZICA"). For some time now, many stakeholders have been calling for increased regulation of the insolvency profession to ensure that the interests of creditors are given the highest priority. Misconduct by a small number of IPs only…